GRE Practice Test Answers

GRE Quantitative Reasoning Practice Test Answers

1. B: To determine the value of x, write 10 000 000 000 in
scientific notation. Because the number has 10 zeros, it can be written as 1010.
Therefore, 1010 = 10 000 000 000 and x = 10. Since 12 is greater
than 10, quantity B is greater.

2. A: Write the equation for Line A in slope-intercept form:
y = mx + b where m is the slope and b is the y-intercept.




Therefore, the slope of Line A is -2 and the y-intercept of Line A is 5. Hence quantity A is greater.

3. C: The ratio of the sides of both triangles is 3:4:5.
Therefore,
and
.
Since , both quantities are equal.

4. A: Calculate the income tax Jane paid each month by
multiplying the percentage paid in taxes by the monthly income earned.

Month

Income earned ($)

Percentage paid in
taxes (%)

Income tax

January

10,000

10

1,000

February

50,000

30

15,000

March

20,000

20

4,000

April

10,000

10

1,000

May

30,000

20

6,000

June

90,000

40

36,000

Jane’s average income tax is .

Jane’s average income is , and 22% of $35,000 = $7,700. Therefore, quantity A is greater.

5. A: A prime number is a positive integer that is divisible by exactly two numbers: 1 and itself. A composite number is a positive integer
that is divisible by more than just 1 and itself. The number 1 is neither prime nor composite. The smallest composite number greater than 2 is 4, and the smallest prime number less than 10 is 2. Therefore,

GRE Verbal Reasoning Practice Test Answers

1. D
In the first paragraph, the author notes that the expression et filioque ‘was widely rebuked by the Eastern churches as lacking theological foundation.’ This statement corresponds with the answer choice claiming that the Eastern Church believed that the expression altered the acknowledged understanding of scripture and was thus unacceptable to them. Answer choice A, claiming that the church in the East rejected the inclusion of a Latin phrase has no justification in the passage, because the author makes no comment about standard liturgical languages among the different churches. Answer choice B is irrelevant, because it discusses the request by the pope to be named supreme head of the Church, instead of the et filioque dispute. Answer choice C includes information that cannot be inferred from the passage; there is not enough detail in the passage to claim that the addition of et filioque reflected theological understanding of the day. Answer choice E simply summarizes the issue as explained in the first paragraph but does not effectively explain why.

2. B, C
In the second paragraph, the author notes the following: ‘The Eastern Orthodox Church, which operated under a recognizably fallible patriarch and a more regional system of bishops, rejected this outright.’ This statement suggests two things. First, the church in the East operated under its own (long-accepted) traditions, with the move by the pope thus placing the church in the East under the church in the West and undermining these traditions. Additionally, it implies that the church in the East, which believed its primary leader (the patriarch) to be fallible, would not be able to acknowledge infallibility in the pope. The author of the passage says nothing about a move by the patriarch to be named supreme head; furthermore, this actually takes away from the statement about the traditions in the East, so it cannot be correct.

3. A, B
The author makes the following statements in the second paragraph: ‘The church was the center of life and governed most aspects of it. Kings and emperors turned to the church for guidance. They ruled with the support of the church, and the church had only to remove that support to create a foundational weakness in the ruler’s power.’ Of the answer choices, two can be derived from this statement. On the one hand, the church offered the people of medieval Europe guidance for everyday life. On the other hand, the church gave moral direction to leaders and influenced their decisions. The author does suggest that the church’s influence could be extended to making or breaking kings, but there is not enough information in the passage to make the claim that the church governed through leaders. (In many cases, this statement was more or less true, but the passage does not go this far, so answer choice C cannot be correct.)

4. C
The author states, ‘The Eastern Orthodox Church, which operated under a recognizably fallible patriarch and a more regional system of bishops, rejected this outright. In breaking communion with the West, the East also broke the sense of accountability that each church had traditionally held toward the other.’ This statement suggests that the communion between the churches offered a degree of accountability, even though the pope was seen as infallible in the West. (The fact that he was not seen this way in the East would necessarily undermine the idea to some degree and maintain an ongoing sense of accountability between the churches.) When the pope asked that the East accept him as the infallible head of the church, the accountability that head developed over the centuries would more or less vanish, and the church in the East would find itself operating under the church in the West instead of working alongside it. Answer choice A might have truth in it, particularly since the author does note that the Eastern Church did not recognize infallibility in its patriarch, but this is not as strong an answer choice as choice C. It takes a more simplistic look at the issue but fails to acknowledge the broader implication of accepting infallibility in the pope. Similarly, answer choice B likely is true, but it fails to consider the larger issue of accountability that the author mentions clearly in the passage. The question that should follow answer choice B is why the East might object to this, and the correct answer choice will, not surprisingly, answer questions instead of raise them. Answer choice D offers details not contained within the passage, so it cannot be correct. (This is in fact true: the patriarch excommunicated the pope, and the pope returned the favor. But the author does not mention this, so the information is irrelevant as an answer choice.) Answer choice E also brings up information not within the passage; the author does not indicate in any place that the churches defined ‘fallible/infallible’ a certain way, so this answer choice cannot be correct.

5. A
The first sentence of the first paragraph reads as follows: ‘The divide between the Christian churches of the East and those of the West went beyond a mere theological break and had broad social, political, and cultural effects.’ This statement summarizes the overall thrust of the passage, and answer choice A offers a clear restatement of this. Answer choice B summarizes the last sentence of the paragraph but fails to include the information about the broader effects of the Great Schism (with regards to social, political, and cultural effects). Answer choice C offers a more skeletal version of answer choice A, but it is not as strong an option and feels vague in focus. It also focuses only on the cultural differences and fails to take into account the social and political effects that the author mentions. Answer choice D infers information not necessarily stated in the passage; the author does not claim that the Great Schism was inevitable, so it is impossible to read this as a summary of the passage. Additionally, answer choice E mentions excommunication, which the author does not mention, so it too fails as a solid summary of the passage.

GRE Verbal Reasoning Practice Test Answers

1. D
In the first paragraph, the author notes that the expression et filioque ‘was widely rebuked by the Eastern churches as lacking theological foundation.’ This statement corresponds with the answer choice claiming that the Eastern Church believed that the expression altered the acknowledged understanding of scripture and was thus unacceptable to them. Answer choice A, claiming that the church in the East rejected the inclusion of a Latin phrase has no justification in the passage, because the author makes no comment about standard liturgical languages among the different churches. Answer choice B is irrelevant, because it discusses the request by the pope to be named supreme head of the Church, instead of the et filioque dispute. Answer choice C includes information that cannot be inferred from the passage; there is not enough detail in the passage to claim that the addition of et filioque reflected theological understanding of the day. Answer choice E simply summarizes the issue as explained in the first paragraph but does not effectively explain why.

2. B, C
In the second paragraph, the author notes the following: ‘The Eastern Orthodox Church, which operated under a recognizably fallible patriarch and a more regional system of bishops, rejected this outright.’ This statement suggests two things. First, the church in the East operated under its own (long-accepted) traditions, with the move by the pope thus placing the church in the East under the church in the West and undermining these traditions. Additionally, it implies that the church in the East, which believed its primary leader (the patriarch) to be fallible, would not be able to acknowledge infallibility in the pope. The author of the passage says nothing about a move by the patriarch to be named supreme head; furthermore, this actually takes away from the statement about the traditions in the East, so it cannot be correct.

3. A, B
The author makes the following statements in the second paragraph: ‘The church was the center of life and governed most aspects of it. Kings and emperors turned to the church for guidance. They ruled with the support of the church, and the church had only to remove that support to create a foundational weakness in the ruler’s power.’ Of the answer choices, two can be derived from this statement. On the one hand, the church offered the people of medieval Europe guidance for everyday life. On the other hand, the church gave moral direction to leaders and influenced their decisions. The author does suggest that the church’s influence could be extended to making or breaking kings, but there is not enough information in the passage to make the claim that the church governed through leaders. (In many cases, this statement was more or less true, but the passage does not go this far, so answer choice C cannot be correct.)

4. C
The author states, ‘The Eastern Orthodox Church, which operated under a recognizably fallible patriarch and a more regional system of bishops, rejected this outright. In breaking communion with the West, the East also broke the sense of accountability that each church had traditionally held toward the other.’ This statement suggests that the communion between the churches offered a degree of accountability, even though the pope was seen as infallible in the West. (The fact that he was not seen this way in the East would necessarily undermine the idea to some degree and maintain an ongoing sense of accountability between the churches.) When the pope asked that the East accept him as the infallible head of the church, the accountability that head developed over the centuries would more or less vanish, and the church in the East would find itself operating under the church in the West instead of working alongside it. Answer choice A might have truth in it, particularly since the author does note that the Eastern Church did not recognize infallibility in its patriarch, but this is not as strong an answer choice as choice C. It takes a more simplistic look at the issue but fails to acknowledge the broader implication of accepting infallibility in the pope. Similarly, answer choice B likely is true, but it fails to consider the larger issue of accountability that the author mentions clearly in the passage. The question that should follow answer choice B is why the East might object to this, and the correct answer choice will, not surprisingly, answer questions instead of raise them. Answer choice D offers details not contained within the passage, so it cannot be correct. (This is in fact true: the patriarch excommunicated the pope, and the pope returned the favor. But the author does not mention this, so the information is irrelevant as an answer choice.) Answer choice E also brings up information not within the passage; the author does not indicate in any place that the churches defined ‘fallible/infallible’ a certain way, so this answer choice cannot be correct.

5. A
The first sentence of the first paragraph reads as follows: ‘The divide between the Christian churches of the East and those of the West went beyond a mere theological break and had broad social, political, and cultural effects.’ This statement summarizes the overall thrust of the passage, and answer choice A offers a clear restatement of this. Answer choice B summarizes the last sentence of the paragraph but fails to include the information about the broader effects of the Great Schism (with regards to social, political, and cultural effects). Answer choice C offers a more skeletal version of answer choice A, but it is not as strong an option and feels vague in focus. It also focuses only on the cultural differences and fails to take into account the social and political effects that the author mentions. Answer choice D infers information not necessarily stated in the passage; the author does not claim that the Great Schism was inevitable, so it is impossible to read this as a summary of the passage. Additionally, answer choice E mentions excommunication, which the author does not mention, so it too fails as a solid summary of the passage.

GRE Practice Test Questions