GMAT Test Dates

All officially accredited business schools require Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores for their applications, so if you want to go to B-school, then there are a few things you should know about how to register for it. The following guide provides a number of links to useful pages on the Official GMAT website, as well as general information regarding test dates and score reports.

Fortunately, there are a number of GMAT test centers available for the computer-based exam, and each of these has a number of scheduled appointments available every day. As a result, it is usually easy to find a center and time to accommodate your schedule.


GMAT Cheat Sheet – What to say when people ask you about the test

  • There are three different sections, including an Analytical Writing Assessment (2 essays: analysis of an argument and analysis of an issue), Quantitative Section (37 questions in 75 minutes), and Verbal Section 41 questions, inclusive of reading comprehension, critical reasoning, and sentence correction).
  • The computer-based exam adapts to the skill level of the test-taker, which means that if you get a problem wrong, then the following questions will be easier, but they won’t be worth as many points.
  • Score reports for the three multiple-choice sections are available before you leave the test center. (The Official Score Report, including the writing assessment, can be found online approximately 20 days afterward. You will be sent an email with a link that will access your scores on the GMAC website.)

Math Practice Questions


Consult the GMAT test structure page for more information about the test itself, the type of questions, test-taking strategies, and so on. Or, for GMAT customer service in the US, or to register for the test, call 1-800-717-GMAT. Additionally, you can mail the registration form to the following address:

Pearson VUE
Attention: GMAT Program
PO Box 581907
Minneapolis, MN 55458-1907

GMAT Reading Comprehension Practice Questions

These questions pertain to the following passage:

A meeting of the High Tribal Council of Urk in the year 5543 addressed parliamentary critiques of the 5542 Freedom of Thought Law. The law’s complete exemption of any thoughts believed to be libelous or licentious from protection—e.g., negative opinions about major political and religious figures or daydreams about taboo or illegal subjects—caused the Council to redraft portions of the law and overturn convictions of many currently incarcerated under it. Supreme councilor Snort McGuinn stated that the law provided “no way to selectively pardon thoughts thought in the pursuit of artistic creativity or legitimate political activity.” Members of Parliament also testified that the overly broad provisions of the law were sometimes used by corrupt bureaucrats as a way to stifle political dissent and to dispossess wealthy artists for personal gain.

As a reply, the Terrestrial House of Parliament drafted PT 5×23, which included numerous proposed changes to the text of the law. A section was written to ensure the liberty to ponder even controversial ideas if the thinker was able to furnish a general explanation as to how his thought process could lead to the betterment of society without compromising social order. In this version, citizens would no longer be required to specifically catalog, register, and answer for each thought they had, but they would instead be able to defend ideas and avenues of inquiry as a whole. Both the Low and High Tribal Councils would be empowered to review these defenses, speeding up the review process considerably. The Orbiting House of Parliament bill, PO 2D54 included all of the changes in the Terrestrial bill but went even further. It provided a legal process to punish bureaucrats using thought restrictions for personal gain, designated free thought zones within personal residences, and a special Civilian Thought Review Council with the ability to permanently legalize new ideas on a case-by-case basis.

The Urk Homeland Security Department strongly objected to the proposed changes, calling them “dangerous, unenforceable, and ill-defined.” They argued that the new laws might actually limit protections for freedom of thought by moving many previously illegal thoughts into a gray area where they could be found either legal or illegal, hampering the efforts of citizens to restrict their thought-processes to wholly legal topics. The elite Department of Friendly and Secret Enforcement further stated that the review of thoughts set up in the new laws could pose a threat to Urk national safety and security.

Both parliamentary laws were passed later that year after a considerable amount of further negotiation and discussion. One key amendment added to the bill was the Sol amendment, which required that bureaucrats detail any possible personal benefit before dispossessing a thought criminal unless detailing those benefits could cause a breach in state security. The president himself objected strongly to this, saying that the amendment would potentially expose huge numbers of government contacts and connections to public view unless the bureaucrats were able to show that each individual secret was exempt from the law.

Before the law was submitted to the president and the High Tribal Council for ratification, the two versions of the bill were combined into one compromise bill. It addressed the president’s concern by making it somewhat easier for bureaucrats to gain exemptions to the disclosure law. It also worked with the Urk Homeland Security Department to tighten the definitions of what constituted thought crime. The bill passed by an overwhelming majority, and the council and president had no choice but to ratify it.


1. The Urk Homeland Security Department opposed the bill because its members felt that the bill would

  1. curtail the public’s right to security
  2. undermine existing national security laws
  3. pose legal problems for ordinary citizens
  4. weaken their own power in enforcing security measures
  5. undermine the authority of the High Tribal Council


2. Of the statements below, which best supports that ‘the review of thoughts set up in the new laws could pose a threat to Urk national safety and security’?

  1. Civilians do not have the knowledge required to judge whether a thought is dangerous or not
  2. Some of the thoughts that are currently labeled dangerous are actually no longer threatening to the political establishment
  3. A civilian board would need a huge amount of resources to review all of the thoughts currently labeled illegal
  4. Civilians can be influenced by government pressure not to legalize a thought
  5. The High Tribal Council has the power to veto all Civilian Thought Review Council decisions


3. Judging by the president’s statement on the Sol amendment, with which statement would he most likely agree?

  1. Bureaucratic conflicts of interest should be exempt from any public scrutiny
  2. Bureaucratic conflicts of interest should be released into the public eye unless doing so would threaten national security
  3. It would be impractical for bureaucrats to have to justify withholding each individual secret from public disclosure
  4. Protection of public safety comes before protection of bureaucratic secrets
  5. Bureaucratic secrets should not be examined individually before being released

GMAT Critical Reasoning Practice Questions


1. A recent exposé reported that a new series of television commercials makes deceptive claims about the health benefits of a new cereal. The reporter drew the conclusion that the commercials could cause consumers to actually choose a less healthful cereal for its supposed health benefits.

Which of the following choices would best reinforce the reporter’s conclusion?

  1. Television stations rely heavily on food commercials as a source of revenue
  2. Television executives have little idea whether a particular commercial is true or false
  3. Viewers depend on commercials as a way to understand the health benefits of new foods
  4. d. Television commercials tend to distort information more than print ads do
  5. All food ads are carefully screened by a panel of experts for accuracy before they are put on the air


2. A state senator asserts that her state’s ban on smoking marijuana is unprincipled and backwards, since more dangerous drugs like nicotine and alcohol are legal. She argues that instead of futilely struggling to enforce the ban, the government should lift all drug prohibition. She asserts that legalization would provide a further benefit by reducing crime.

Assuming the following statements are true, which does the most to weaken the senator’s argument?

  1. Many people use drugs because of the thrill of getting away with it. Therefore, legalizing drug use would drive these people away, lowering the rate of drug use.
  2. The senator’s state already makes drug enforcement a low priority. Therefore, legalization wouldn’t have much effect on the law enforcement budget.
  3. Since marijuana was first outlawed, the number of users has increased substantially every year.
  4. If drugs were legalized, users from neighboring states would be drawn in. Many of them are involved in racketeering and other serious illegal activities.
  5. Many illegal drug users argue that they can get high on cough syrup and other legal pharmaceuticals.


3. Scientists studying the CPUs (equivalent to the brains) of killer robots discovered that the robots receive just as many commands to crush humans when recharging as when actively crushing. In order to discover why the robot’s massive steel claws don’t respond to the crush command when the bot recharges, a scientist removed a chip in the primary sympathetic processor (PSC), a module that connects the robot’s body to the CPU. Without leaving recharge mode, the robot grabbed the scientist, threw him to the ground, stomped him repeatedly, and then proceeded to crush several imaginary people while stomping around the room. In combination with the account above, which statement lends most support to the conclusion that the recharging robot was acting out some sort of evil robot dream?

  1. The chip that was removed from the primary sympathetic processor normally triggers the robotic recharge state and the diminished activity that accompanies it
  2. The PSC can pass on data even if the robot is recharging
  3. The chip that was extracted normally transmits commands from the CPU to the robot body
  4. The chip that was extracted normally stops commands from moving from the CPU to the robot body
  5. The CPU seems to select different targets for crushing when asleep than when awake


4. A widely believed anthropological theory states that the Hill People, an early culture on Mucky Muck Island, fought with and were eventually wiped out by the Lothars whose culture dominates the island today. More recently, however, anthropologists have proposed that modern Mucky Muck culture is more complex than they previously thought. The theory states that the Lothars, the Hill People, and several other tribes lived side-by-side for a long time and that the modern culture shows influences from several societies. Which piece of evidence would most strongly support the more modern theory about the culture of the Mucky Muck Islanders?

  1. Archaeological evidence shows that both the Hill People and the Lothars originated in Central Europe at least 10,000 years before they arrived on Mucky Muck Island
  2. The Hill People and the Lothars had similar height, build, and facial features
  3. A modern Mucky Muck myth incorporates a Hill People hero, one of the gods of the Lothars, as well as fertility rituals used by other cultures in the area
  4. The Hill People culture remained a primitive hunter-gatherer culture, while the Lothars learned agriculture and advanced tool-making skills
  5. The Lothars were willing to trade with strangers, while the Hill People were culturally insular and suspicious


5. Radiation is not the cause of the increase in mutations in the area around the abandoned weapons testing facility. Instead, the increase is caused by the fact that more thrill-seekers have recently moved to the area. Statistics show that thrill-seekers are more likely to undergo genetic mutations, and these thrill-seekers comprise a greater proportion of the population around the facility than ever. A flaw in this argument is that it fails to account for the possibility that

  1. thrill-seekers were born as normal, non-thrill-seeking children
  2. there are plenty of citizens around the plant who are not thrill-seekers
  3. the increase in radiation may just be a fluke
  4. thrill-seekers are not statistically more likely to have drastic mutations than other people
  5. thrill-seekers are more likely to expose themselves to radioactive environments such as the abandoned facility than other people are

GMAT Data Sufficiency Practice Questions

These Data Sufficiency problems are comprised of a question and two statements, (1) and (2), in which certain data are presented. You must decide if the data given in the statements are sufficient for correctly answering the question, using nothing but the data given in the statements along with your math knowledge commonly known y facts (such as how many days there are in June or the meaning of clockwise). You will have five choices (shown below), and you must choose only one for each problem.

  1. Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2)is not sufficient.
  2. Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) is not sufficient.
  3. BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
  4. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
  5. Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

1. If Barry is y years old and Charisse is z years
old, what is their combined age?

(1) Barry is 16 years older than Charisse.
(2) Ten years from now, Barry will be twice Charisse’s age.

  1. Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2)is not sufficient.
  2. Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) is not sufficient.
  3. BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
  4. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
  5. Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

2. If l, w, and h represent the length,
width, and height respectively of a rectangular solid, what is the volume of
the solid?

(1) lw = 40
(2)lwh = 30

  1. Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2)is not sufficient.
  2. Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) is not sufficient.
  3. BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
  4. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
  5. Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

3. What were the net proceeds from a fundraiser on the third
day it was held?

(1) Net proceeds on the third day were $50,000 more than the
first day.
(2) Net proceeds on the third day were three-quarters the
second day’s net proceeds.

  1. Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2)is not sufficient.
  2. Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) is not sufficient.
  3. BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
  4. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
  5. Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

4. What is the value of x?

(1) 1 – 3x = 7x + 5
(2) = -10

  1. Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2)is not sufficient.
  2. Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) is not sufficient.
  3. BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
  4. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
  5. Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

5.

Is the triangle above a right triangle?
(1) a = 5, b = 12, c = 13
(2) x = 45

  1. Statement (1) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2)is not sufficient.
  2. Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) is not sufficient.
  3. BOTH statements TOGETHER are sufficient, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient.
  4. EACH statement ALONE is sufficient.
  5. Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient.

GMAT Quantitative Problem Solving Practice Questions

1. If a movie reached the 90-minute mark 12 minutes
ago, what minute mark had it reached m minutes ago?

  1. m – 102
  2. m – 78
  3. 102 – m
  4. 78 – m
  5. 90 – m

2. A bull’s-eye with a 4-inch diameter covers 20
percent of a circular target. What is the area, in square inches, of the
target?

  1. 0.8 π
  2. 32 π
  3. 10 π
  4. 20 π
  5. 80 π

3. Which of the following is less than 5/8

  1. 7/10
  2. 4/5
  3. 6/11
  4. 0.625
  5. 0.65

4. A wholesale bakery marks up the price of a loaf of bread by 20 percent. The grocery store that resells that bread then marks up the increased price by 20 percent. This series of successive markups is equivalent to what single markup?

  1. 20 percent
  2. 22 percent
  3. 30 percent
  4. 40 percent
  5. 44 percent

GMAT Sentence Correction Practice Questions

Each of the next questions is comprised of a sentence, which has been underling, either wholly or in part. You will then be given five different ways of phrasing the part that has been underlined, based on grammar, sentence construction, word choice, effectiveness, etc. The first choice simply restates the original; the other four are each different in some way. If you believe the original phrase is the best choice, select the first answer; if not, select one of the other choices.

1. Skeptical visitors often dismiss the Castle Blood hauntings on the basis of the lack of a tangible experience, such as spirit knockings, that are called conclusive evidence of the occult, and ignore less obvious phenomena, such as faint whisperings and cold mists.

  1. a tangible experience, such as spirit knockings, that are called conclusive evidence of the occult, and ignore less obvious phenomena, such as
  2. a tangible experience, such as spirit knockings, that are called conclusive evidence of the occult, and ignore less obvious phenomena, such as what is experienced as
  3. a tangible experience, such as spirit knockings, that is called conclusive evidence of the occult, and ignore less obvious phenomena, such as
  4. what they think of as tangible experience, such as spirit knockings, that are called conclusive evidence of the occult, and ignore less obvious phenomena, such as what is experienced as
  5. what they think of as tangible experience, such as spirit knockings, that are called conclusive evidence of the occult, and ignore less obvious phenomena, such as

2. A frequent source of stress for entering freshmen happens when students enroll in out-of-state schools, and it makes them grow apart from their high school friends.2. Of the statements below, which best supports that “the review of thoughts set up in the new laws could pose a threat to Urk national safety and security”?

  1. when students enroll in out-of-state schools, and it makes them grow apart
  2. by a student enrolling in an out-of-state school, which makes him grow apart
  3. when students enroll in out-of-state schools, thereby growing apart
  4. when a student who enrolls in out-of-state schools, and so grows apart
  5. if a student enrolls in an out-of-state school, he would grow apart

3. Egyptologists believe that the desiccated bodies recently found in an Egyptian tomb, evidently those of servants who are believed to have been buried nearly 4,000 years ago, remained intact and undisturbed by rot or scavengers because of their dry, stable, and isolated environment

  1. evidently those of servants who are believed to have been buried
  2. those of servants, evidently, who were believed to have been buried
  3. those of evident servants who were believed to have been buried
  4. those of servants who are believed to have been evidently buried
  5. those of servants who were evidently believed to have been buried

4. Unlike Hakim Bey, Robert Anton Wilson felt how late 20th-century technology not as an inherently alienating force, and something that could potentially liberate people from their hang-ups, isolation, and prejudices.

  1. Robert Anton Wilson felt how late 20th-century technology not as an inherently alienating force, and
  2. Robert Anton Wilson saw late 20th-century technology not as an inherently alienating force, but as
  3. Robert Anton Wilson felt that late 20th-century technology was not as an inherently alienating force, and
  4. it was felt by Robert Anton Wilson that late 20th-century technology was not an inherently alienating force, but
  5. it was felt by Robert Anton Wilson that late 20th-century technology was not an inherently alienating force, but

5. Federal investigators surveying the crash scene noted that only one-third of the passengers on board the plane had been issued life jackets. At the least as many as 80 or more other ones had not been given any flotation device whatsoever.

  1. At the least as many as 80 or more other ones had not been given any
  2. At the least as many as more than 80 other ones had not been given any
  3. More than 80 other ones had not been given any
  4. At least 80 had not been given any
  5. There were at the least 80 or even more who had not been given any

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